THE MISFITS BOOK

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The Misfits book. Read reviews from the world's largest community for readers. Kids who get called the worst names oftentimes find each other. That's. What do a year-old student who moonlights as a tie salesman, a tall, outspoken girl, a gay middle schooler and a kid branded as a hooligan have in common. *"A fast, funny, tender story that will touch readers." "[A] timely, sensitive, laugh- out-loud must-read. This book is needed." "A knockout. One of the best of the.


The Misfits Book

Author:WILMA KRIETE
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ISBN:700-7-20691-564-2
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Visit Scholastic, the world's largest children's book publisher. Whether you need a classic kids book or classroom-proven teaching materials, discover it at. The Misfits by James Howe - Sticks and stones may break our bones, but names will break our spirit. Welcome to Paintbrush Falls, home of Bobby, Joe, Addie, and Skeezie: the four best friends of the Misfits series whose “fast, funny, tender” (School Library.

Overall a quick, enjoyable read. Add a group of 7th graders to the mix and you have the perfect middle school drama. James Howe may have aged up the voices of the main characters a bit, but it works. Typical school drama with socially aware kids kept me turning the pages. The story felt fun and light until real heart started showing up. The feels went off the chart during the big speech.

The moments Bobby and his dad share on the pages really got to me. In " The Misfits" by James Howe. I found out that Joe is gay, and that he likes Colin. Addie also likes Colin. Skeezie is the go-betweener for Addie.

Or in other words, he puts notes in his locker for her. The teachers made them stop the Freedom party. They came up with the no-name party. It's to stop students from being called names and being bullied anymore. The only thing different is that DuShawn dropped out from being President. Now Addie is president and Joe is vice president.

I wonder if the teachers would take down this third party again. Will it work out? Oct 08, Carolina Irato added it. I thought this book was really important because it relates to the world now. The key to anything. This book is teaching us how a label doesn't show who you are. A lot of words have been called to a lot of kids. They are also showing how this election can impact the people who call the names.

View all 3 comments. Jul 07, Joshua rated it it was amazing. This book didn't get any supergreat critical response when it came out, but I found it hilarious, engaging, and full of truly sympathetic if not totally realistic characters.

Especially now that we're back in an election year, I bet it'd work pretty great for group discussion, and there are scenes in there that'd make for some killer Readers Theater probably best for middle school-age kids. Rock on, Howe. In chapter 18, Bobby talks to his dad about him liking a girl.

At the end they end up talking about his mom. When this happened, it showed a lot about bobby and his dad as characters. Bobby says that he doesn't want to be like his dad when he's older and that shows that he wants to be better than what is dad is making him do like work for his family and live in a trailer. Oct 06, Ian Tymms rated it it was amazing Shelves: A must-read for Middle Schoolers. Great Grade 6 book with lots to say about fitting in and tolerance.

Thoughtful, compassionate and one of those great books that leaves you hopeful. May 30, Cooper Sakaguchi rated it did not like it.

Are you kidding me James Howe? Nov 06, Katy rated it it was amazing Shelves: And some people get nothing but a string of cards that no matter how they're played will never add up to a winning hand. It takes your whole being to do it -- your eyes and your ears, your brain, and your heart. Maybe your heart most of all. I feel like I have figured something out here, something important, something that I thought was hard but turns out to be pretty simple.

It doesn't take a genius.

The Misfits Club

Now, I am really disappointed by this book. For a book that is middle grade and follows a year-old main character, everyone in this book talks and acts like they're years old. That isn't to say that year-olds can't be mature, just that they would act differently than they do in the book.

This one just left me with a bunch of unanswered questions that annoyed me. Like why does this year-old have a job at such a young age?

I was annoyed at how a lot of the characters were being over Now, I am really disappointed by this book. I was annoyed at how a lot of the characters were being overdramatic and talking about how much in love they were with people they barely even knew. The good thing about this book is that it does discuss bullying, but even that was cheesy at times.

Apr 28, Cooper McCombs rated it it was amazing. I absolutely loved this book. It taught me a lot about myself which never happened when I read books. The idea that your unique makes you fit in with the rest of the people and makes you shine as a person. Great book highly recommend it. Aug 31, MBF rated it really liked it. Great read. Very entertaining and provided a great insight on what a difference children can make in society.

Nov 15, Tate Colarik rated it it was amazing. One of the best books I have ever read. Oct 23, Madeline Clements rated it it was amazing Shelves: I really liked this book and the diversity of the characters in it. It went into student government which I'm normally not interested in, however this book kept me entertained. I enjoyed it and would recommend it to a friend. Oct 23, Hannah Groeschen rated it really liked it.

This is one of the best coming-of-age novels I have ever read. I felt connected to some of the characters, specifically Addie, and I was intrigued by the idea of approaching the topic of name-calling through a middle school election. Both of these things made The Misfits hard to put down. Jun 06, Matthew Hampton rated it really liked it. In "The Misfits", which takes place in Paintbrush Falls, New York, present time, the protagonist Bobby is in middle school and is an outcast because of his weight.

He stays with his group of friends and other outcasts; Skeezie, the down to earth and mellow Elvis lover, Addie, a tall and very smart girl, and Joe, who is so creative and flamboyant that bullies follow him everywhere. Together, they call themselves the Gang of Five, and hold forums every Friday to talk about there issues. Addie pr In "The Misfits", which takes place in Paintbrush Falls, New York, present time, the protagonist Bobby is in middle school and is an outcast because of his weight.

Addie protests against many things, like saying the Pledge of Allegiance, and this givers her the reputation of a leader, and activist. So when the school elections come up, Addie immediately starts a new, independent party that would support minorities.

The Gang of Five wants to win, and work together to try to get the word out about the new independent Freedom Party. But this doesn't work because neither the students or the staff get the message, which is also unclear to the Gang. Skeezie, Joe, and especially Addie just want to represent every student and equality among the student body. Until Bobby understands acceptance of others and themselves, they Gang floats around looking for ideas to represent the students in a unique and popular way.

Bobby comes up with the idea to start the No-name party. The new party is built on a campaign to end name calling throughout the school, and start a no-name day, where name calling is banned for the day. The rest of the Gang is enthusiastic about the idea, and begin to campaign their party. As the campaign goes on, each member of the Gang realize that they, themselves were minorities, and they will represent misfits, outcasts, and anybody who has ever been called a name.

This bold campaign gains momentum in the school, with both the students and the staff. This is the No-name party's motto. This is a great novel for someone who wants to know about acceptance during adolescence, and provides good insight on the concept of equality and justice for all.

I think this was the author's purpose, as well as National No-name Week, which was inspired by this book. Judging by that alone, I would say this book was a success. It is relatively easy to read, and the chapters are broken up in an organized fashion.

Some of the actions in the book were specific enough to be unpredictable, even though the gist was somewhat generic, it still carried suspense. The author's style is unique and really gets the point across for this book, the point being acceptance is only given when you give it. Jun 06, Joseph Duncan rated it really liked it.

The Misfits

The "Sticks and stones may break our bones but words will never hurt me" statement is one of the most inaccurate sayings of all time. Words do hurt in any way, shape or form. The Misfits was one of the greatest books I've ever read. It was very inspiring, encouraging and amazing.

The main character, Bobby, is an overweight boy in the seventh grade who has been bullied for years from name-calling. Although he has been called all of those names, he has three incredibly, great friends: Addie, Joe The "Sticks and stones may break our bones but words will never hurt me" statement is one of the most inaccurate sayings of all time.

Addie, Joe and Skeezie. They too, have been called names just like Bobby has. However that doesn't stop them. Even if they are called these putrid and impolite names, the four of them do not care. Leastwise, in our own eyes we are, and that's all that really matters" Howe Even though they've been treated this way for many years, it doesn't destroy themselves; they ignore it.

During the year, the school election was approaching with the two parties, the Democracy and Republic. But Addie, who is one of Bobby's friends, had an idea to make a third party called the Freedom Party.

Unfortunately, the party didn't work out and it was abolished from the election. One day at lunch, something had sparked inside of Bobby's head; something that was there all along but invisible to the naked eye.

Since he and his friends are bullied, the thought popped inside of his head and ideas were bursting. He now knew what to do. The three parties had also required to make a speech in front of the whole school and Bobby had created one, an amazing one.

After Bobby spent time negotiating with Addie, Addie made Bobby give the speech because of what he had just made. Once the speech was over, Bobby changed the people's lives. Although they didn't win, they still had made a difference.

Bobby and his friends stood up to everyone around them who called them names and they never thought it as a bad thing. They refused to listen to such discrimination and did their best to stop it. This book was marvelous, touching and suitable for anyone to read. Remember, there shall be no name-calling. The same criticisms that could be leveled at Howe's 'Bunnicula' books apply to 'The Misfits,' I suppose. But one person's 'corny' and 'saccharine' can be another's 'funny' and 'sweet.

The book evoked a strong emotional connection, too, making me cry as well as laugh. I'm not the only one with this combined personal and intellectual response. The novel is realistic about such efforts--name calling will always be around--and makes its points without being preachy. For young people blithely, and often innocently, tossing out the comment, 'That is so gay' as a character in 'The Misfits' does , reading the book might make them consider what that comment really means, on a number of levels.

Any label, even less charged ones like 'dweeb,' prevent us from seeing each other as individuals. At a time of life when kids are figuring out who they are as individuals, and are so susceptible to peer pressure and bullying, it could help to recognize that.

At my far more advanced stage of life, it helps. Howe creates complex characters, keeps his story moving along, and touches on more themes than name-calling, among them connections and disconnections between adults and children, the ways we deal with death, and the hormonal urges which so intensify relationships in middle school. If his ending tied things up quite neatly, it was also very cathartic.

I've had this book and have been meaning to read it for a while. Seeing it on the 'Kids Recommend' list http: How is this eye-opening and ultimately inspiring for Bobby? Wyman, Mr. Can you think of other examples where something has been lost, but something much bigger has been won?

What surprised you about the ending of the story? Can you try to predict how your circle of friends at school will end up one day? Why or why not? Who and why? Does being gay or not affect your opinion?

What do you think of her position? Do you agree or disagree with the position of the principal, Mr. Is it better for fiction to reflect the way things are or point the way to how things could be? If not, what gets in the way of making this possible? What are their strengths and how do these strengths help them? What assumptions do you make about groups or types of people? Did you know that in the past, people were jailed or even killed for calling people names?

Research historical situations where this was an outcome of name-calling. When has name-calling been used to oppress people? Provide current examples involving celebrities, members of the media, politicians, or local figures by reading the newspaper or scanning the Internet for several days or a week.

Why and when were these political parties launched, and what do they stand for? What party would you join? View 1 comment. May 15, Mo rated it it was ok. This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here.

A look at the need for tolerance toward people with differences in middle school age kids. A group of misfits one tough guy, one brainiac girl, one fat boy, and one boy who comes out of the closet decide to run a candidate for student class president and institute changes in the school to bring about greater tolerance for all kinds of minorities.

The rating on this one would be a lot higher, probably a five, but for the irritating way Howe deals with the character Joe. Joe is twelve and has alr A look at the need for tolerance toward people with differences in middle school age kids. Joe is twelve and has already decided that he is homosexual. Beyond the fact that that may be a bit young for kids to be dealing with issues of sexual orientation, I didn't like the way Howe made Joe into a caricature of the stereotypical Hollywood-loving, fashion-concerned, artistic gay male.

It only reinforces misconceptions that boys interested in "girly" things are gay, thus complicating matters for straight boys who like design and arts over sports and cars. Beyond that which is merely a sub-plot , the message is a good one and delivered with great wit and heart.

View 2 comments. Jul 31, Nicole rated it did not like it. I know that preachy, bullying-is-bad books are popular at the moment, but this is the worst one I've ever read. The moral of the book is supposedly that you should get to know your classmates as unique individuals rather than stereotyping them into categories like "nerd" and "jock," but the author has hypocritically thrown together every stereotype he could think of instead of creating interesting, dynamic characters.

This book is insulting to every type of teenager. Sep 06, Erin rated it did not like it. I read this overnight in order to help my seventh-grade Godson with his back to school ELA assignment. The more I read it, the more annoyed I got. This book is rated as being age appropriate for year olds, yet there is absolutely no way that children this age could wade through the tremendous amount of agenda-driven BS that makes up the majority of the first half of the book.

Touted as a book about anti-bullying, the book touches on homophobia, racism, police brutality, and a number of oth I read this overnight in order to help my seventh-grade Godson with his back to school ELA assignment. Touted as a book about anti-bullying, the book touches on homophobia, racism, police brutality, and a number of other contemporary social justice issues, with absolutely no way for young readers to make any discernment about the issues.

The only way this book works is as a teacher or parent driven discussion springboard, and quite frankly, it's more appropriate for a class on current events than ELA. The problem is, children are going to read alone, and not ask the right questions. I asked my Godson several questions related to issues in the plot, and he was mostly just confused.

He's academically on target. It's wholly irresponsible to basically drop these culture bombs on kids, explode them, and then not stick around to clean up the mess. For example, at one point one of the characters uses the ethnic slur "mick," and while another character objects, there is no relating it to other race issues in the book, nor is it labeled as being truly racist.

At one point a girl's future is described as a basically totally useless one in which she's unemployed and suffering from an eating disorder -- all because she was a cheerleader in seventh grade. It's not so much that this is a badly written book per se.

It's that the way the book is written isn't suited for its audience. It's too subversive. You know how when you go to a children's movie, the writers often insert some adult humor? It felt like that, except what was being inserted wasn't funny.

More books from this author: James Howe

It was social agenda, plain and simple. The thing is, when dealing with a kids' movie, it makes sense that there's some adult humor, since at least during the initial theatrical run, kids need adults to take them to theater, and so there are at least adults in the theatre. But with the book, there's no need to address the adults. I don't have a problem with social message books, even for young children.

What I do take issue with is a book purporting to be about one social issue while under the masquerade, it pushes a bunch of other issues on kids with no real responsibility. I did what a responsible adult should do. I discussed the book with my Godson. We had a very timely conversation about what it means to refuse to stand for the Pledge of Allegiance.

But that's not what every guardian is going to do -- especially not if they don't know that this is the kind of book that needs that sort of guidance. And children's books shouldn't really need directions. For my two cents, Mr. Howe should stick to writing about vampire bunnies. Oct 12, Madeline Greene rated it really liked it.

Bobby is a 12 year old tie salesman who is part of a group at his school. They are not the most popular kids and people always call them names, but they don't care what other people think. The gang of five consists of 4 kids; Addie, Bobby, Joe and Skeezie. Skeezie is the cool person of the group, hair slicked back and leather jackets.

Addie is the independent person, and stands for her own opinion. Joe is the girly one of the group, always having one fingernail painted. Finally bobby is the laid Bobby is a 12 year old tie salesman who is part of a group at his school. Finally bobby is the laid back one, always quiet.

He agrees. The gang ends up not doing the freedom party, but they rename it the no name calling party, which will prevent people calling each other names for a week.

DuShaun decides not to run for president, so it's up to the gang to win. In their more personal lives, Bobby got to talk with Mr. Kellerman and found out that he is going through the same thing he did, and Mr.

Kellerman apologized about always being so mean. Joe admitted that he was gay, and that he liked Colin, a boy who Addie also likes. I can't wait to see if the gang wins the election! I finished the misfits and the gang didn't win the election, but Bobby gave an amazing speech at the election.

Colin ended up being gay, and Joe and him dated. Bobby and Kelsey ended up going to the dance together, Addie and DuShaun go to the dance together and dated for the rest of their 7th grade, and Skeezie realized love isn't bad. Bobby became a senator, Addie became a social studies teacher, Skeezie got married, and Joe became a writer.

I wonder if the gang ended up staying friends in their adult lives? Feb 21, Kelley. R rated it really liked it. They laugh together, have lunch tog Kids who get called the worst names oftentimes find each other.

View all 22 comments. Oct 19, Sophie Rosenthal rated it liked it. They all use each other to stay strong, and away from bully's. They want to get rid of bullying and enforce freedom. So, to do that, they come up with the Freedom Party in their school election. The party represents minority's. When the party is told that they can't participate in the election, they come up with the No-Name Party.

The No-Name Party represents everyone ever called a name. So they are in the election after all.

This is a good book for 6th-7th grade students. Jul 09, Michelle Martineau rated it really liked it. Sweet book about a group of friends who band together to push back against the negative way kids treat each other. I thought the ending was a little overly tidy with all the coupling between the characters, but a cute story. Good way for kids to think about a variety of ideas like name-calling, growing up questioning your sexuality and gender stereotypes, and other social issues.

Kids now may be puzzled by the lack of phones an Sweet book about a group of friends who band together to push back against the negative way kids treat each other. Kids now may be puzzled by the lack of phones and technology in the book, since it did come out a while ago! Overall a quick, enjoyable read.

Add a group of 7th graders to the mix and you have the perfect middle school drama. James Howe may have aged up the voices of the main characters a bit, but it works. Typical school drama with socially aware kids kept me turning the pages. The story felt fun and light until real heart started showing up. The feels went off the chart during the big speech. The moments Bobby and his dad share on the pages really got to me.

In " The Misfits" by James Howe. I found out that Joe is gay, and that he likes Colin. Addie also likes Colin. Skeezie is the go-betweener for Addie. Or in other words, he puts notes in his locker for her. The teachers made them stop the Freedom party. They came up with the no-name party. It's to stop students from being called names and being bullied anymore.

The only thing different is that DuShawn dropped out from being President. Now Addie is president and Joe is vice president. I wonder if the teachers would take down this third party again.

Will it work out? Oct 08, Carolina Irato added it. I thought this book was really important because it relates to the world now.

The key to anything. This book is teaching us how a label doesn't show who you are. A lot of words have been called to a lot of kids. They are also showing how this election can impact the people who call the names. View all 3 comments. Jul 07, Joshua rated it it was amazing. This book didn't get any supergreat critical response when it came out, but I found it hilarious, engaging, and full of truly sympathetic if not totally realistic characters. Especially now that we're back in an election year, I bet it'd work pretty great for group discussion, and there are scenes in there that'd make for some killer Readers Theater probably best for middle school-age kids.

Rock on, Howe. In chapter 18, Bobby talks to his dad about him liking a girl. At the end they end up talking about his mom. When this happened, it showed a lot about bobby and his dad as characters. Bobby says that he doesn't want to be like his dad when he's older and that shows that he wants to be better than what is dad is making him do like work for his family and live in a trailer.

Oct 06, Ian Tymms rated it it was amazing Shelves: A must-read for Middle Schoolers. Great Grade 6 book with lots to say about fitting in and tolerance. Thoughtful, compassionate and one of those great books that leaves you hopeful. May 30, Cooper Sakaguchi rated it did not like it. Are you kidding me James Howe?

Nov 06, Katy rated it it was amazing Shelves: And some people get nothing but a string of cards that no matter how they're played will never add up to a winning hand.

It takes your whole being to do it -- your eyes and your ears, your brain, and your heart. Maybe your heart most of all. I feel like I have figured something out here, something important, something that I thought was hard but turns out to be pretty simple.

It doesn't take a genius. Now, I am really disappointed by this book. For a book that is middle grade and follows a year-old main character, everyone in this book talks and acts like they're years old. That isn't to say that year-olds can't be mature, just that they would act differently than they do in the book.Children's Announcements. It sometimes confuses people that the author of the humorous Bunnicula series also wrote the dark young adult novel, The Watcher, or such beginning reader series as Pinky and Rex and the E.

This is all far less important than solving the mystery they are now faced with, especially as there is no-one else who even believes there is a mystery to solve. Great storyline with interesting characters. It is interesting to watch the children in particular develop and reveal more about themselves as the book goes on.

Howe creates complex characters, keeps his story moving along, and touches on more themes than name-calling, among them connections and disconnections between adults and children, the ways we deal with death, and the hormonal urges which so intensify relationships in middle school.

We call ourselves the Gang of Five, but there are only four of us. He has also written for older readers.

The anti-bullying movement is very strong in this country and Howe has created a story that will resonate with many readers. Jun 15, Brooke Berry rated it it was ok.